Thursday, October 6, 2016

The Tunic Bible Blog Tour and Giveaway!


I have been a long time admirer of the work of the authors Julie Starr and Sarah Gunn. When they invited me to make a tunic from their, not then released book, I was thrilled! I initially thought I was to be a pattern tester, but learned my make would be included in the book gallery alongside other sewists I admire. I did not attend American high school, but I felt like I was invited to eat lunch at the "cool kids table"! 



When you call something a "Bible", you set the bar pretty high for meeting all your needs. This book claims to be "the only tunic pattern you'll every need! It includes a graded bodice pattern with alternate neck plackets, collars, and sleeves that allow you to tailor tunics to suit any style, length and fabric. After reading and sewing from this book, I think it lives up to its' name.

I have mentioned before that I loathe tracing patterns. I am also lazy when it comes to learning a new pattern writers process. It doesn't stop me from making them, but it does slow me down. These usual prohibitions become irrelevant with the limitless options available here. The book is visually appealing and loaded with inspiration and mixing formulas to customize your tunic.



With so many possibilities, I happily contemplated which of the many versions I would make. The beauty of this book is that even if you are not  tunic wearer, you can find a style that works for you. In the end, I chose the short tunic with the shorty placket and the ruffle sleeve.





I made my tunic in an Ankara Wax print based on my measurements with no adjustments. I love the silhouette and the way it skims my body without being to snug. I did not add a zipper when I made it last Fall. I am recovering from 2 knee surgeries since then and suffering from a lack of cardio. I may add a zipper now to help ease getting it on and off.




I was drawn to this tunic option because of this ruffle sleeve. It's construction is like none I have done before and I love the structure it has. It is poofy and stable at the same time! 





I considered a contrast placket, but decided I wanted to showcase all of the wax fabric. This would be fun with contrasts on the ruffle and placket don't you think?

When Julie asked me to make a tunic, I immediately thought of the possibilities of a jersey hand-stitched version. The time-frame was too tight to make the book gallery deadline, but I knew I had time for the book release.


                  


I made this hand-embellished, hand-sewn tunic using the V-neck placket and slim sleeves tapered to the wide width. I stenciled and airbrushed the front fabric using my flower stencil before sewing around the shapes to secure the red layer to the black. I then removed the middle of the shapes to complete the reverse applique technique.




I stitched red and silver sequins at the ends of the pointed stars for some sparkle. To guild the lily, I added an exposed bias neckline secured with random beaded parallel stitches along the neckline.


I added a 1/2 inch fabric strip along the wrists and secured them with more random beading to mimic that of the neckline.




The wrist and dress hems are left raw and unhemmed. They will curl in time adding more texture. 

    


These tunics are unbelievably comfortable and easy to wear. Now that the pattern is traced, I am sure to try the other variations. I have my eye on a maxi length version next.

Ever generous, Sarah and Julie are giving away a copy of  The Tunic Bible to one lucky reader. The contest is open everyone nationally (hard copy) and internationally (digital copy). I will also give the winner an stenciled image felt version of this flower stencil. The 18in. x 12in. firm felt is painted with the design and just needs to be cut so you can get started. 

Enter here:
a Rafflecopter giveaway

To continue the blog tour be sure to visit the other bloggers.

October 3
October 4
Cloning Couture www.cloningcouture.com
Generation Q Magazine www.generationqmagazine.com
October 5
Oonaballoona www.oonaballoona.com
Featherstitch Avenue www.featherstitchavenue.com
October 6
October 7
Sew Busy Lizzy www.sewbusylizzy.com
Jennuine Design www.jennuinedesign.com
October 8
Inside The Hem www.insidethehem.com
Girls in the Garden www.girlsinthegarden.net
October 9
My Love Affair with Sewing www.myloveaffairwithsewing.com
October 10
Evolution of a Sewing Goddess www.evolutionofasewinggoddess.blogspot.com
Creating in the Gap www.creatinginthegap.ca
October 11
House of Pinheiro www.houseofpinheiro.com
The Tunic Bible www.thetunicbible.com
Happy Sewing and read your Bible,
Bianca

108 comments:

  1. Your choices are wonderful. The wax cotton so beautiful and the red knit is so full of possibilities.

    ReplyDelete
  2. I haven't seen a tunic in jersey before. Your personal embellishments are really creative and I love the textures and layers, and the little bit of bling. I lean toward traditional styles, and that's probably because I need to loosen up a bit and be more expressive in my choices. Your red version is really helping me to see the possibilities, although I wouldn't look as good as you do in that style, so I'll have to adapt it. The wax print is lovely too.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Robin! I tend to be a rule breaker when it comes to my fabric choices. I make what I like and either rejoice or lament the decision. This is a good tester for you to "loosen up" with because you can tweak it to your personal style.

      Delete
  3. I think I'd go with a maxi v-neck tunic. Not sure about fabric choice.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Beautiful! I want to make a v-neck maxi with knit. Hopefully there's a way to make it nursing friendly ;)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh that would be a fun challenge! Maybe an enlarged placket that snaps in place. You can use in a bold print to hide the snaps...

      Delete
  5. I'm sure one of the first things in the book is going to be a definition of a tunic. So many say "I never wear tunics" and yet, when they make one it is quite flattering. Both of yours look great!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks so much! You are correct they define a tunic and give a little bit of history into the garment. :)

      Delete
  6. Bianca, I love that wax print tunic of yours. I think I might have to copy you :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks and go for it! Your next one will look as great as your first!

      Delete
  7. I love the style of both of yours! I have some beautiful hand dyed indigo fabric from Africa that my wonderful friend bought back for me that I think would be gorgeous in this pattern. I've been trying to decide what to make with it!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh Ramona, hand dyed Indigo sounds divine! What a great friend you must be! :) Thanks for your kind words!

      Delete
  8. I'm eyeing the maxi version too! I love both of yours!

    ReplyDelete
  9. As usual, you knocked it out of the park! I'm so glad you were asked to participate - look at all the fabulousness!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You are always so kind Helen!!! Thanks! I am glad they asked too.

      Delete
  10. I love both versions you made, but the red is so creative. The embellishments must have taken a lot of time, but it was so worth it - a one-of-a-kind creation.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you! They took quite a while and yes, worth it!

      Delete
  11. Beautiful tunics--love both dresses!

    ReplyDelete
  12. We all need more easy-2-wear clothes

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes! and it helps if they look good too! :)

      Delete
  13. The Alabama Chanin style tunic is AMAZING!!! Good work! Your tunics turned to be dresses ;)
    The books idea sounds very interesting!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you! Be sue to follow the tour and see all the other variations.

      Delete
  14. I just love the tunics you made. Since I've also seen Deepika's review on PR, I am confident the pattern will suit a variety of figures. So exciting!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes it is exciting! There is a tunic for everyone!

      Delete
  15. I think I need to read the whole book first before I decide. I am a wash and wear person so I love cotton-polyester but your jersey is great.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Good point! Be sure to see the other tunics on the tour to see all the possibilities.

      Delete
  16. Wow - love your version! I like long tunics (the better to hide my wobbly bits!)! Thanks for sharing your views! mumbird3(at)gmail(dot)com

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. :) there are some good "wobbly bits" hiding tunics in the book!

      Delete
  17. How fun! I love those puffy sleeves too!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Laura! Yes those sleeves are great!

      Delete
  18. So impressive and both so different! Can't wait to get my copy.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Jane! Good luck in the contest!

      Delete
  19. I love that there are sleeve and neckline variations. I would love something like your red version which is stunning in shape and details!

    ReplyDelete
  20. Love the appliqué with beads and sequins....very sheshe

    ReplyDelete
  21. I love both your tunics! Summer is coming over here in Australia, so I would probably make a dress length tunic in a nice light cotton or linen.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you! I have always loved a linen tunic!

      Delete
  22. Both tunics are just amazing. I love all of the detailing and beadwork you did on the red one. Gorgeous!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Tomasa! I have been waiting for a year to share these. I am glad they are well received!

      Delete
  23. It's Tunic Bible meets Alabama Chanin! And it's amazing!! I love that you created your own stencil. Your interpretation of Alabama Chanin techniques and your interpretation of the tunic is perfect. Great job!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Tracey! We call it Texas Springer when I put my spin on it ;)

      Delete
  24. Wow, these are both so gorgeous! I like tunics but haven't made many yet - I'd love to try one in a very colourful fabric & in dress length - you've made that combo look very appealing :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I am easily drawn to new projects and have not made as many tunics as I like. This book may change that!

      Delete
  25. I love tunics, a good maxi is always a must! The African wax print is gorgeous and I still have a bunch of print knits that need a job! Oh the possibilities!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes! Maxi Tunics rock! Thanks Lisa!

      Delete
  26. Bianca, Both your tunics are beautiful. You took the essence of the book and created something uniquely your own. Great job! BTW, I was honored to be sitting at the “cool table” with you.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks so much! when I saw your tunic in the gallery submission stage last fall, I was so impressed. I knew I wanted to push it a bit more for the tour. :) Please pass the sugar ;p

      Delete
  27. I love the versions you made! I'm not sure what I would make, but I do have some Ankara fabric that I would love to use for this, if I still have enough. I would probably make a shirt or above-knee length tunic.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Lisa! The good thing with Ankara is that a little bit goes a long way. You can do a version with a contrast placket, sleeve, or dress body. This book will inspire many options.

      Delete
  28. Wow!!! You look gorgeous!! Love the fabrics you chose!

    I would do a dress version with a V neck. And I would go shopping for some inspiration! Maybe in black or navy? Or maybe a fun print!! There are SO many possibilities!! Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Karrie! Yes! There are so many possibilities!

      Delete
  29. I'm so in love with your tunics. I'm one of those ladies who would say, "I don't wear tunics." Looking at yours makes me think, maybe I don't know what a tunic really is. LOL! I love your fabric choices. You look stunning. Thanks for sharing. I will definitely be purchasing this book.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks so much Anita! I have a silly voice in my head screaming " Yes! A convert!" :) I can't wait to see your tunics! Good look in the contest!

      Delete
  30. I would make a tunic out of linen and use the ruffle collar version! Yours are beautiful.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Sounds great! You just gave me an idea for some Essex Linen in my stash! Good luck in the contest.

      Delete
  31. I love to wear short tunics for tops and maxi lengths for a long version, made out of cotton, or blends

    ReplyDelete
  32. I love wax print tunics and would make a bunch.
    Your appliqué is beautiful !

    Thanks for the opportunity.

    ReplyDelete
  33. I love your choices of fabric and embellishments! I would use a blue and white fabric and make a classic/ prep style tunic. Thank you for the book draw!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I have a blue and white seersucker in my stash... thanks for the inspiration! :) Good Luck in the contest.

      Delete
  34. I think I may have just sent you an email by mistake, sorry, but I do mean what I said, your red tunic dress is gorgeous! Thanks for the giveaway.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I got it :) Thanks so much and good luck in the contest!

      Delete
  35. I need more tunics. I love the sleeves on both of yours. I would probably start with a ruffle-neck, maybe using some navy cotton sateen (w/ an owl print)in my stash, but would want to try them all!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh my! That sounds great! You are extending my tunic making list!

      Delete
  36. Love both tunics! They look fabulous on you. I don't wear tunics, short waisted & full busted but would love to make a dress as you have. Such inspiration.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you! There is one for everyone in this book!

      Delete
  37. I really like the knit version with the flowers! I have been wanting to do this technique for a while but am stumped as to how to start. Seeing your tunic has me wanting to finally jump in and try it!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks! I suggest you start with the yoke of a top, or a small project. You will get the feel for it and decide if you want to keep going. If you win, you will a stencil to begin with.

      Delete
  38. I love both of your tunics! So many options to choose from. I can't wait to make a couple after seeing all the great garments.

    ReplyDelete
  39. Tunics forever! This one is just gorgeous. The stenciling the cut outs...all of it.

    ReplyDelete
  40. Both of your tunics are beautiful. I am excited for this book to be released.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks so much! Good luck in the contest!

      Delete
  41. Love this pattern and what everyone has done with it. Great ideas, ladies! Hope I can try this tunic in the near future.
    Thank you for this great giveaway. Have a super great day!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks so much! Best of luck in the giveaway!

      Delete
  42. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  43. I'd make a placket tunic out of tencel with embroidery on the placket for the first one. Many ideas for other tunics, such a great variety. Love your red tunic. It is gorgeous.

    ReplyDelete
  44. This is a perfect pattern for a wax print!

    ReplyDelete
  45. Before I saw your embellished dress, I was considering making a linen tunic. Now I wish to win a copy of this book, only to try to recreate something similar to yours :)

    ReplyDelete
  46. I love your versions, so beautiful! Thank you for the chance to win a copy plus your stencil. What a treat.

    ReplyDelete
  47. All of these tunics are beautiful. I would love a maxi made from a beautiful black knit.

    ReplyDelete
  48. Your tunics are beautiful but I am not interested in the book. The red is spectacular......

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. This comment has been removed by the author.

      Delete
  49. Oh my! Your tunics are gorgeous! That book is now a must-buy, unless I win one of course! ;-)

    ReplyDelete
  50. What fun fabric choices! I would have said a classic tunic length until I saw your two dress length versions. I'd like to make a dress length tunic similar to your red one. Thanks for the chance to win.

    ReplyDelete
  51. Fabulous fabric choices - gorgeous tunics!!

    ReplyDelete
  52. Your choices of fabric and embellishment are beautiful! That red tunic dress is just amazing. Thanks for the opportunity to win.

    ReplyDelete
  53. You know, I always look at tunics and say "eh not for me" but the more I see of the creations from this book the more I'm rethinking that. elkedoring@gmail.com

    ReplyDelete
  54. I am in awe of your workmanship! Thanks for showing us two different options. This book seems like a bargain for all of the possibilities. Thanks Bianca --Allie

    ReplyDelete
  55. I love sleeveless in my warm climate, but I also like a 3/4 length sleeve so I'd have to do both. The ruffle neckline shown in the book looks intriguing and made in a dress length would be my choice. Thanks for the giveaway. Great job on your makes. kathyhills22 (at) gmail (dot) com

    ReplyDelete
  56. I would make a 3/4 sleeve tunic with black silk and golden beads.

    ReplyDelete
  57. I absolutely am loving the styling. The 3/4 sleeve with flutter is on my todo list. Keeping fingers crossed! Martha Garichild@aol.com

    ReplyDelete
  58. This was such a great post! Our jeans styles such as the Slim Raw Hem Mom Jeans In Blue Wash are especially made to make you look flattering and glamorous.

    ReplyDelete