Tuesday, October 30, 2018

How Many Fabric YoYos Did I Need To Make A Full Length Kimono?

 

Is that a good or fair question? On this side of the answer, I am not so sure. Had I asked that question at the beginning of this project, the answer would have been so daunting, we may never have known! About year ago, on a trip to Austin, my family discovered Austin Creative Reuse, a resale store for makers and creatives. My family of 4 all loved the small store and everyone stocked up on supplies for technology-free entertainment. 


We scored radical savings on our finds, but as the register was being rung, I felt I spent more than I planned. That fact did not turn my eye away from a bag of vintage fabric yo-yos on a shelf nearby. I am a sentimental fool and my heart broke for the person whose incomplete hand-sewn project was donated away. In my head, I concocted a scenario of their sudden tragic unexpected death and grief stricken relatives getting rid of them because of painful memories. (Yes, I know it is possible that the person is alive and well and donated them as a UFO's they were de-stashing, but justify, justify). Anyway, my soft heart could not leave them behind and I added them to my purchases.






Upon inspection at home, I found that the bag contained strips of hand-sewn fabric yo-yos on the way to becoming a blanket and individual yo-yos not yet connected. My initial plan was to complete the blanket, but I found it wasn't functionally practical for the warmth I need for couch cuddling.  I decided I wanted to wear it and found this image of Bjork for inspiration.


Her couture jacket is beautiful and I knew I could make my own version if I didn't overthink it and get overwhelmed by the prospect. The idea was in my head for months, but I did nothing with it because it seemed frivolous and unnecessary. Truly, where would I wear something like that? I have been trying to focus on practical sewing of things that will get daily use. So I set it aside.  

Closet Case Files and True Bias are hosting the #sewfrosting community challenge on Instagram. The goal is to make a bold, brave, inventive garment that is less about the substance of "cake" sewing, and more about the fun and frothy "frosting". The challenge was the prefect time to gather those fabric circles and get making nothing I need, but something I want.  


I used Simplicity 1108 to make the full length version of view C. 

Image result for simplicity 1108

I made it up as I went and was not sure I would write about the process. Frankly, I wasn't sure anyone but me would be interested in wearing, much less making one. Now that it is done and I love it, I can advise you on how to proceed if you want to make your own.


  1. Choose fabrics or scraps to make fabric yo-yos using a Quick yo-yo tool the size of your scraps will depend on the finished yo-yo size you are going for        
  2. Connect your yo-yos to each other at the sides with hand stitches and strong button and craft thread. This will make your "fabric."                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                    
  3. Cut a pattern size down from what you would normally. When you make your yo-yo fabric, you will keep the yo-yo's intact at the seams rather than cut them down to fit the pattern. This overhang will give you the extra ease lost in sizing down.  For center back, treat it as a single piece cut on a fold rather than 2 pieces with a center seam.                                                   
  4. As you make your fabric, check your size progress against the pattern pieces                                                                                                                        
  5. Once the fabric has been made to the corresponding pattern pieces, complete construction in the order described in the pattern. Omit the binding/facing and hemming instructions as the yo-yos will serve as the edges. I attempted to complete the construction with hand-sewn seams. I got as far as sewing the top and under shoulder seams by hand. It was time-consuming and as I contemplated my 5'8" frame, I opted to machine sew them.                                                                                                                                  

I prefer the look of the hand sewn yo-yos for the general construction of the fabric. For the  side seams, I am not mad at these machine sewn ones. 


Because of the weight of the kimono, I added a shorter front "collar" of yo-yos to the neckline for more support. The center front is closed with hook and eye closures on 5 sets of yo-yos.                                                                               


                      
I am really excited about this project. I love the artsy vibe and hand-crafted dedication that went into each little circle. I can imagine fabric scraps from completed garments, being collected in a basket more than 40 years ago; remnants of treasured garments made with love.  I know this kimono wasn't the original makers' plan, but I hope they would appreciate what I have done.

                   

This will be a Fall staple for me as the temperatures begin to drop. 


I will be at Quilt Market and Festival this week and next. I doubt I will be hard to spot in my coat of many colors, my wind blown Afro and my "Hell yeah! I made this!" strut.
  

Back to the original question, how many fabric yo-yos did I use to make a full length kimono? For this piece, FOUR HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SIX! 476! FOUR HUNDRED AND SEVENTY SIX! 476!




If you are going to make one, I wish nimble fingers and happy sewing!
Bianca

23 comments:

  1. I'm sure the maker of all those yo-yo's would be very happy to see all that effort come to life in such a beautiful way!

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    1. Thanks so much for saying that, I hope so!

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  2. How creative! It sounds like it was a labor of love! I'll look for you and your coat of many colors at the Houston Quilt Festival!

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    1. Thanks Carrie! I am thrilled with it! See you soon!

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  3. Love your jacket and LOVE Austin Creative Reuse! I go every week and try not to buy back stuff I had donated the week before! ;-)

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    1. Lol! We have made special trips to Austin to pop in there! We have since discovered Texas Art Asylum here and it saves on gas!

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  4. Absolutely gorgeous and soooooo you! Enjoy wearing it!

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    1. Isn't it so me!!!! I love it and will need to be told to take it off!

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    1. That's high praise from you Michelle! Thanks!

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  6. Absolutely Stunning and Beautiful!!!

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  7. I love this so much. If I happened upon you walking down the street, I'm pretty sure I would jump up and down with glee and maybe chase you down a bit just to tell you how beautiful your jacket was. I also am a firm believer that Bjork should be used as an every day life fashion inspiration way more often! :)

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    1. Thanks! I completely understand that and would probably do the same if the tables were turned. That being said, my chest got tight with anxiety reading that! LOL! I will brace myself for appreciation when I wear it!

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  8. This is so cool and inspirational! Love it! I don't know if I'll take on a kimono, but I'm pondering those totes or somesuch for Christmas gifts. Love your post!

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    1. Thanks so much! I think a tote is good starting point. I have some leftover that I am thinking of using that way too.

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